Want to work in Australia? Find the Visa that’s right for you

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April 5, 2024

Want to work in Australia? Find the Visa that’s right for you

Migrants currently hold 26.3% of all jobs Australia-wide, meaning that if you are capable of enhancing Australia’s workforce, you are likely to find employment opportunities in the country. If you want to work in Australia, you will need an appropriate visa that suits the work you intend to do. When it comes to applying for a work visa, there are many different options to choose from which can be overwhelming and complex. This guide will give you an overview of the Australian visa types, and direct you to the fitting visa you should apply for. If you are still uncertain about which visa is right for you, speak with the expert team at AustraliaMigrate who can assist you with any questions you may have.

Employer Sponsored Visas

This type of visa allows you to live and work in Australia permanently when you have obtained a sponsorship nomination from an employer. There are two types of employer sponsored visas:

Temporary Skill Shortage Visa (Subclass 482)

This visa enables employers to sponsor a suitably skilled worker to fill a position when an appropriately skilled Australian worker cannot be sourced. This visa consists of two streams; a Short-Term stream of up to two years, and a Medium-Term stream of up to four years. To be eligible for this visa, you must be nominated by a Standard Business Sponsor, you must have a positive skills assessment, and you must have undertaken an English language test. 

Employer Nominated Scheme (ENS) (Subclass 186)

This visa offers a pathway to permanent residency to skilled workers who are nominated by their employer. There are two streams in this visa; the Temporary Residence Transition Scheme, and the Direct Entry stream. To be eligible for this visa, you must possess the necessary skills, you must be nominated by an Australian employer, and you must meet health and character requirements.

Skilled Migrant Visas

If you are a skilled person and want to work in Australia, a skilled migrant visa may be the right option for you. There are four types of skilled migrant visas:

Skilled Independent Permanent Visa (Subclass 189)

A skilled independent permanent visa is for professionals and skilled applicants seeking to live and work permanently in Australia. To be eligible for this visa, your occupation must be on a relevant occupation list, you must be aged between 18 and 45, you must have a positive skills assessment, and you must have undertaken an English language test. There is no sponsorship required for this visa. 

Skilled Nominated Permanent Visa (Subclass 190)

This visa is for professionals and skilled applicants seeking to live and work permanently in Australia. To be eligible for this visa, your occupation must be on a relevant occupation list, you must be aged between 18 and 45, you must have a positive skills assessment, and you must have undertaken an English language test. Unlike the skilled independent permanent visa, this visa requires nomination by an Australian state or territory government. 

Skilled Regional Permanent Visa (Subclass 887)

This visa is for people who have lived and worked in regional Australia on a previous, eligible visa. It is the second stage visa that gives permanent residence to previous visa holders and does not require sponsorship by an Australian relative or nomination by a state or territory government. This visa allows you to stay in Australia indefinitely, work and study in the country, apply for Australian Citizenship, and sponsor eligible relatives for permanent residence. To be eligible for this visa, you and your dependents must have been in Australia holding a skilled regional (provisional) visa (subclass 489) for at least two years. During this time, you must have worked full-time for at least twelve months in a regional area. 

Skilled Nominated Permanent Visa (Subclass 191)

The newly introduced subclass 191 visa is for people who have lived and worked in regional Australia on a previous, eligible visa. It is the second stage visa that gives permanent residence to previous visa holders. To be eligible for this visa, you must have been in Australia holding a skilled work regional (provisional) visa (subclass 491) and have been working for at least three years in a regional area.

Global Talent Visa (Subclass 858)

This is a permanent visa for people who have an internationally recognised record of achievement in an eligible field. It offers a streamlined visa pathway for highly skilled professionals who are interested in working and living permanently in Australia. A global talent visa allows you to remain in Australia indefinitely, work and study in the country, apply for Australian Citizenship, and sponsor relatives for permanent residence. It also allows you to access certain Australian government benefits and buy property in the country. There are two pathways to obtain this visa; the Global Talent Independent Program (GTIP) and the Distinguished Talent Visa Pathway.

Regional Work Visas 

If you are a skilled person wanting to work in regional Australia, a regional work visa may be the right option for you. There are many opportunities outside major cities after obtaining this visa. There are two types of regional work visas:

 

Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 491)

This is a visa for skilled workers seeking to work in regional Australia. A skilled work regional (provisional) visa allows you to remain in Australia for five years, live, work, and study in a regional area in Australia, and apply for permanent residence after three years. 

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 494)

This is a visa for skilled workers seeking to work in regional Australia. This visa enables regional employers to sponsor skilled overseas workers where an appropriately skilled Australian worker cannot be sourced. Once granted, it allows you to work only for your sponsor, remain in Australia for five years, live, work, and study in a regional area, and apply for permanent residence after three years. 

Short Term Work Visas

If you are looking for temporary work in Australia, a short term work visa may be the right option for you. There are three types of short term work visas:

Short Stay Specialist Visa (Subclass 400)

This visa is for people seeking highly specialised, non-ongoing work in Australia. Generally, a short stay specialist visa is granted for up to three months, but up to six months may be allowed in certain circumstances. To be eligible for this visa, you will need to have specialised skills, knowledge, or experience that can assist a company in Australia in completing a project or contract. 

Temporary Activity Visa – Training (Subclass 407)

This is a visa for people seeking to enhance their skills through a structured workplace training program. A temporary activity visa can be granted for up to two years. To be eligible for this visa, you will need to have at least twelve months’ experience in the last two years in the occupation you wish to be trained in. 

Temporary Activity Visa (Subclass 408)

A temporary activity visa is for people seeking specific types of work on a short-term temporary basis, including those working in the entertainment industry or participating in sports. To be eligible for this visa, you must have the skills to undertake the activity in Australia, be supported or sponsored, and meet additional requirements of the relevant stream. 

Business Visas

If you are seeking to own and manage a business in Australia, conduct business activity, or invest, a business visa may be suited to you. There are two types of business visas:

 

Business Innovation and Investment (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 188)

This visa is valid for five years and enables you to own and manage a business in Australia. There are four streams under this visa that offer a direct pathway to permanent residence after three years when certain requirements are met. The four streams under this visa include; the Business Innovation stream, the Investor stream, the Significant Investor stream, and the Business Talent Visa – Entrepreneur stream

Business Innovation and Investment (Permanent) Visa (Subclass 888)

This visa is for entrepreneurs, investors, and business owners who are seeking to continue their activity in Australia. To be eligible for this visa, you must be the primary or secondary visa holder (partner) of a subclass 188 visa, have met all requirements in the stream in which you first applied, and hold a current nomination by an Australian state or territory government.

 

Coming to Australia on a working visa is an incredible way to experience the country and what it has to offer. If you have any questions about the above information or need help applying for a work visa, we are here to assist you. Contact us to speak to one of the experienced migration agents at AustraliaMigrate today.

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